Vaccination

There is both an active and a passive immunization against hepatitis A and B. There is no vaccination against hepatitis C to date. Combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccinations do exist. They are usually administered at zero time, after one month, and after six months and have been shown to be highly effective (≥ 90 %).

Vaccination against hepatitis A

The vaccination is recommended for:

  • Drug users
  • Any personnel coming into close contact with drug users or with persons from at-risk regions
  • Travellers to endemic zones (visit www.safetravel.ch for a list of corresponding countries)
  • Children residing in Switzerland and originally from endemic areas, who are travelling to their home countries
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Persons with chronic hepatitis, especially hepatitis C
  • Persons with HIV, HCV and HBV coinfections

Vaccination against hepatitis B

The vaccination has been recommended for all 11- to 15-year- olds in Switzerland since 1998. It vaccination is preventive in nature in order to minimize the risk of infection with the onset of sexual activity. The vaccination is recommended for the other age groups in the following situations:

  • Health care personnel coming into contact with blood or possibly infected bodily fluids, soiled or contaminated objects, and infectious materials
  • Social workers, prison and police personnel, coming into frequent contact with drug users
  • Drug users
  • Persons who frequently change sexual partners
  • Persons living in the same household with or having sexual contact with virus carriers (HBs antigen)
  • Persons originally from at-risk areas (Africa, Asia, Oceania, certain regions of South America) (visit www.safetravel. ch for a list of corresponding countries)
  • Travellers to endemic zones who will come into close contact with the local population (extended stay or risky behaviours)
  • Persons with reduced immunofunction (immunocompromised persons), patients with artificial kidneys (patients with hemolytic anaemia), hemophiliacs
  • Persons with chronic hepatitis C
  • HIV/HCV coinfected persons